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October is National

Substance Abuse

 Prevention Month

From Substance Abuse and Mental Health

 Services Administration (SAMHSA):

The Scope of Substance Abuse in America

Substance use, including underage drinking and the non-medical use of prescription and over-the-counter medications, significantly affects the health and well-being of our nation’s youth and people of all ages:

  • An estimated 10 million people aged 12 to 20 report drinking alcohol during the past month. To put that in perspective, there are more Americans who have engaged in underage drinking than the number of people who live in the state of Michigan.
  • Approximately 23 million Americans—roughly the population of Australia—are current illicit drug users. Marijuana use and non-medical use of prescription medications are the most common types of drug use in America.
  • Almost 18 million Americans are classified with alcohol dependence or abuse.
    • Heavy alcohol use can cause serious damage to the body and affects the liver, nervous system, muscles, lungs, and heart.
    • Alcohol is a factor in approximately 41 percent of deaths from motor vehicle crashes.
Stopping substance abuse before it begins can increase a person’s chances of living a longer, healthier, and more productive life.





From The Office of National Drug Control Policy:

In 2011 President Obama issued the first-ever Presidential Proclamation designating October as National Substance Abuse Prevention Month. The tradition continues in 2014 as parents, youth, schools and community leaders across the country join this month-long observance of the role that substance abuse prevention plays in promoting safe and healthy communities.

Why do we recognize National Substance Abuse Prevention Month?

Every day, far too many Americans are hurt by alcohol and drug abuse. From diminished achievement in our schools to greater risks in our roads and in our communities, to the heartache of lives cut tragically short, the consequences of substance abuse are profound. Yet, we also know that they are preventable.

The President’s Drug Control Strategy promotes the expansion of national and community-based programs that reach young people in schools, on college campuses, and in the workplace with tailored information to help them make healthy decisions about their future.  In fact, recent research has concluded that every dollar invested in school—based substance use prevention programs has the potential to save up to $18 in costs related to substance use disorders.

This month we pay tribute to all those working to prevent substance abuse in our communities and rededicate ourselves to building a safer, drug-free America.

http://www.whitehouse.gov/ondcp/prevention-intro/prevention-month



Mental Illness Awareness Week

05-11 October 2014



From The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI):

In 1990, the U.S. Congress established the first full week of October as Mental Illness Awareness Week (MIAW) in recognition of NAMI's efforts to raise mental illness awareness. Since then, mental health advocates across the country have joined with others in their communities to sponsor activities, large or small, for public education about mental illness.

Why is Mental Illness Awareness Week important? 


Each year millions of Americans face the reality of living with a mental health condition. During the first full week of October, NAMI and participants across the country are bringing awareness to mental illness. Each year we fight stigma, provide support, educate the public and advocate for equal care. Each year, the movement grows stronger.

We believe that these issues are important to address year round, but highlighting these issues during Mental Illness Awareness Week provides a time for people to come together and display the passion and strength of those working to improve the lives of the tens of millions of Americans affected by mental illness.




Red Ribbon Week

23-31 October 2014


From The National Family Partnership (NFP):

The National Family Partnership organized the first Nationwide Red Ribbon Campaign. NFP provides drug awareness by sponsoring the annual National Red Ribbon Celebration. Since its beginning in 1985, the Red Ribbon has touched the lives of millions of people around the world. In response to the murder of DEA Agent Enrique Camarena, angered parents and youth in communities across the country began wearing Red Ribbons as a symbol of their commitment to raise awareness of the killing and destruction cause by drugs in America.

In honor of Camarena's memory and his battle against illegal drugs, friends and neighbors began to wear red badges of satin. Parents, sick of the destruction of alcohol and other drugs, had begun forming coalitions. Some of these new coalitions took Camarena as their model and embraced his belief that one person can make a difference. These coalitions also adopted the symbol of Camarena's memory, the red ribbon.

In 1988, NFP sponsored the first National Red Ribbon Celebration. Today, the Red Ribbon serves as a catalyst to mobilize communities to educate youth and encourage participation in drug prevention activities. Since that time, the campaign has reached millions of U.S. children and families. The National Family Partnership (NFP) and its network of individuals and organizations continue to deliver his message of hope to millions of people every year, through the National Red Ribbon Campaign.

Sign The Red Ribbon Pledge


What's The Pledge About?
  1. As parents and citizens, we will talk to our children and the children in our lives about the dangers of drug abuse.

  2. We will set clear rules for our children about not using drugs.

  3. We will set a good example for our children by not using illegal drugs or medicine without a prescription.

  4. We will monitor our children's behavior and enforce appropriate consequences, so that our rules are respected.

  5. We will encourage family and friends to follow the same guidelines to keep children safe from substance abuse.

Take the Red Ribbon Pledge now and 
be a part of the creation of a drug free America! 




CASAC Newsletter
CASAC Newsletter
http://www.preventsuicidect.org/
http://www.preventsuicidect.org/
CASAC Brochure
CASAC Brochure
Simsbury TV - Suicide Prevention
 

§ 131 — DISPOSAL OF UNWANTED MEDICATION

§ 131 — DISPOSAL OF UNWANTED MEDICATION
The bill requires the Consumer Protection Department (DCP), in consultation with the Connecticut Pharmacists Association and Connecticut Police Chiefs Association, to develop and implement a program to collect and dispose of unwanted pharmaceuticals (medication). The program must provide for (1) a secure locked box accessible to the public 24 hours a day to drop off unwanted medication anonymously at all local police stations and (2) transporting the medication to a biomedical waste treatment facility for incineration.
The bill requires DCP, within available appropriations, to organize a public awareness campaign to educate the public about the program and the dangers of unsafe medication disposal. It also allows DCP to adopt implementing regulations.
EFFECTIVE DATE: October 1, 2014

http://cga.ct.gov/2014/BA/2014HB-05597-R00-BA.htm
____________________________________________________
What CAN and CANNOT be discarded in local medication drop-boxes

YES:
• Over-the-counter medications
• Prescription medications
• Medication samples
• Medications for household pets
• Medicated lotions or ointments

NO:
• Needles or other “sharps”
• Hazardous waste
• Thermometers
• Personal care products (shampoo, etc.)

Present Active Drop Box Programs in the Capital Area Substance Abuse Council (CASAC) Region

CANTON POLICE DEPARTMENT
45 RIVER RD COLLINSVILLE CT 06019

FARMINGTON POLICE DEPARTMENT
319 NEW BRITAIN AVE UNIONVILLE CT 06085

NEWINGTON POLICE DEPARTMENT
131 CEDAR ST NEWINGTON CT 06111

SIMSBURY POLICE DEPARTMENT
PO BOX 495 SIMSBURY CT 06070

WINDSOR LOCKS POLICE DEPARTMENT
4 VOLUNTEER DR WINDSOR LOCKS CT 06096


 

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